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hopewellian communities in illinois

Edited by Thorne Deuel - 1952

Papers by Thorne Deuel, James B. Griffin,, Winslow M. Walker, John C. McGregor, Melvin L. Fowler and Georg K. Neumann

2011 Reprint Edition

 

An excellent resource on the Hopewell of Illinois and the Hopewell in general.

Paper authors to this volume include: Thorne Deuel, Illinois State Museum , James B. Griffin, University of Michigan, Winslow M. Walker, John C. McGregor, University of Illinois, Melvin L. Fowler, Illinois State Museum, and Georg K. Neumann, Indiana University

Thorne Deuel on Mound Builders

The term, mound builders, early caught the popular fancy, notwithstanding that Indian groups of many widely differing cultures and times built or were agents in producing mounds of varying types under differing conditions. Indian mounds include those built with a definite cultural aim in mind and those that grew incidentally when shells or refuse accumulated in the same area for many years. Some were built to cover graves, others shaped as pyramids with flat tops on which temples were raised to awe the people with the dignity and power of the gods. Our ancestors in Europe erected similar tumuli to contain tombs and we in the United States today have our city dumps and could equally well be considered mound builders.
Although any Amerindian (American Indian) group who erected mounds of any type whatever may be included at times in the term, the Hopewellians are the MOUND BUILDERS, par excellence. This is due largely to the numerous large to medium sized monumental earthen mounds occurring in the central United States, many of which yield impressive burial chambers of timber or stone, containing a small number of skeletons lying at full-length, with insignia of rank and rich personal ornaments. Nevertheless, mound building in itself was much less significant than the many social and spiritual activities implicit in the total picture yielded by the archaeological remains.
Gold, silver and precious stones from the mounds are so rare that they may be said to be almost non-existent. Pearls from river clams are frequently found in large numbers but are, of course, valueless now, due to the action of corrosive agents in the soil. Nevertheless, romantic imagination is still excited by the discovery of the small and artistic stone pipes frequently with the bowl beautifully carved in the form of an animal, diminutive human statuettes of pottery, sheets of mica from North Carolina, implements of native copper from the Lake Superior region, obsidian and grizzly bear teeth from the Rocky Mountains, marine shells of many types and sizes from the South Atlantic Coast and the Gulf of Mexico, and the fine, decorated pottery.

 

This 6-1/2" x 9-1/2" soft cover, facsimile reprint contains 271 pages including 94 full page plates and drawings and 15 tables.  $19.95

       


Naturalistic Figures Jackson ware - Hubele Site Artifacts from Mound wh9
Pipes and containersfrom Mound wh6 Pipes and trephined skull fragment - Mound wh5 Weaver cordmarked pots

Table of Contents


No. 1.
No. 2.
No. 3.
No. 4.
No. 5.

No. 6.

Introduction - Thorne Deuel, Editor
The Dickison Mound Group, Peoria County. Winslow M. Walker
The Havana Site. John C. McGregor, University of Illinois
Some Early and Middle Woodland Pottery Types in Illinois. James B. Griffin
The Clear Lake Site: Hopewellian Occupation. Melvin L. Fowler
Hopewellian Sites in the Wabash Valley. Georg K. Neumann and Melvin L.
    Fowler
The Hopewellian Community. Thome Deuel
Bibliography

Illustrations

I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII

XIII
XIV
XV
XVI
XVII
XVIII
XIX
XX
XXI
XXII
XXIil
XXIV
XXV
XXVI
XXVII
XXVIII
XXIX
XXX
XXXI
XXXII
XXXIII

XXXIV
XXXV
XXXVI
XXXVII
XXXVIII
XXXIX
XL
XLI
XLII
XLIII
XLIV

XLV
XLVI
XLVII
XLVIII
XLIX
L
LI
LII
LIII
LIV
LV
LVI
LVII
LVIII & LIX
LX
LXI
LXII
LXIII
LXIV
LXV
LXVI & LXVII
LXVIII
LXIX
LXX
LXXI
LXXII
LXXIII
LXXIV
LXXV
LXXVI
LXXVII
LXXVIII
LXXIX
LXXX -LXXXVI
LXXXVII-LXXXVIII
LXXXIX
XC
XCI
XCII
XCIII
XCIV

Panorama of the Dickison Mounds
Log Tomb and Burials, P"478
Log Tomb Burials, P"477
Map of Dickison Site and Mound Cross-sections
Ground Plan and Cross-section of P478
Plan of Log Tomb, P478
Mass Burial, P"478
Ornaments and Insignia Found With Burials, P477 and 478
Grave Goods From P4 78
Stone Implements From Mound Fill, P477 and 478
Pot Sherds From Mound Fill, P"477 and 478
Chipped Flint Artifacts From Dickison Site Surface Collections and Sherds From the Rench Site
Mn9 Before Excavation and House Pattern Beneath Mn"9, Havana Site
Map of Havana Site
Plan and Cross-sections, Mn9
Floor Plan of House Beneath Mn9
Stone Implements and Metal Beads, Mn9
Chipped and Ground Stone Objects, Mnv15
Projectile Points, Mnv 15
Objects of Antler, Bone and Shell, Mnv15
Vessel Shapes, Mnv15
Decorated and Corded Pottery Types, Mnvl 5
Rim Sections, Mnv 15
Pots From Mn6
Decorations on Pots From Mn6
Distribution of Pottery Types, Mnv15
Rare Sherds From Mnv15 and Pots From Mn6
Black Sand Incised Sherds, Tvl
Ferric Incised and Morton Incised Sherds, Tvl
Neteler Stamped, Sister Creeks Punctated, Marion Thick Sherds, Tvl
Havana Zoned, Cordmarked, Plain Sherds, Tvl
Naples Stamped Sherds, Tvl
Naples Stamped, Hummel Stamped, Montezuma Punctated and Steuben Punctated Sherds, Tvl
Naples Ovoid Stamped and Hummel Stamped sherds, Tvl
Hopewell Ware Types
Weaver Rim Sherds
Weaver Cordmarked Vessels
Havana Ware Vessels
Map of Clear Lake Site
Test Trench Profiles, Tvl
Canton Ware Sherds, Tvl
Distribution of Wares and Surface Treatment, Museum Test Trench
Distribution of Wares and Surface Treatment, Schoenbeck Collection
Distribution of Wares and Surface Treatment, University of Chicago Test Trench; Distribution of Decorative Elements, All Test Trenches
Rim Sections, Tvl
Projectile Points, Tv 1
Projectile Points and Knives, Tvl
Flint Knives, Drills and Scrapers, Tvl
Chipped and Ground Stone Tools, Tvl
Bone Artifacts, Tvl 1
Ornamental Objects and Copper Tools, Tvl
.... Tobacco Pipes and Shell Artifacts, Tvl
.... Central Tomb, Wh6
.... Map, Sites Near Rising Sun, Illinois
.... Dogtown Hills and Mound Wh6
.... Map of Ethel R. Wilson Site
.... Ground Plan, WhM
... Artifacts From Tomb, Wh4
.... Ground Plan, Wh5
.... Artifacts From Tomb, Wh5
.... Ground Plan, Wh6
.... Eighty Foot Profile, Wh6
.... Excavation of Wh6 and Burial, Wh6-2
.... Detail of Tomb, Wh6
.... Artifacts From Tomb, Wh6
.... Caches of Flint Working Tools, Wh6
.... Artifacts From Caches, Wh6
.... Textile Impressions From Copper Celt
.... Ground Plan, Wh7
.... Artifacts From Tomb, Wh7
.... Ground Plan, Wh"9
.... Artifacts From Wh9
. . Ground Plan, Whc10
.... Ninety-five Foot Profile, Whc10
. . . Artifacts With Burials, Wh'10
.... Burial Types, Whc10
.... Map of the Huebele Site
.... Jackson Sherds, Whv30
.... Hopewell Sherds, Whv30
.... Sherds of Doubtful Ware Affiliation
.... Chipped Flint Artifacts, Whv30
.... Stone Artifacts, Whv30
.... Hopewellian Sites in Illinois (Map)
.... Six Spearheads From Aldrich Collection
.... Hopewellian Statuettes and Reconstructions
Tables

I
II
III
IV
V
VI
VII
VIII
IX
X
XI
XII
XIII
XIV
XV

Key to Pottery Types
Proposed Simplified Classification
Burial Data From P477 and P478
Trait List, Dickison Site
Trait Comparison, Dickison and Other Sites
Animal Remains, Havana Site (Mnv15)
Artifact Distribution, Mnvl 5
Pottery Type Criteria, Mnvl 5
Trait List, Havana Site
Animal Remains, Tvl
Proposed Sequence, Dickison, Havana, and Clear Lake Sites
Burial Data, Whc10
Pottery Type Distribution, Whv30
Artifact Distribution, Whv30
Trait List, White County Sites