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Primitive Man in Michigan

Walter B. Hinsdale - 1932

 Gustav's Library Vintage Reprint

Hinsdale's classic of Michigan archaeology  weighs in with some interesting and unique archaeological sites and fantastic artifacts.  From earthworks to barbed axes, it's all here in a very informative study of the great state of Michigan's prehistoric past.  Exquisite articles of shell, stone, copper, flint, pottery, bone, etc. are pictured and described.

Hinsdale described his hopes for an archaeological future of Michigan with these words:  "The motive in preparing an introduction to Michigan archaeology is to bring to public attention, as forcefully as possible, the fact that the state had, and now has, some rather distinctive antiquities. In the interest of education and science, these deserve to be studied, preserved as far as possible, and classified.
     The Museum of the University of Michigan would appear to be a proper center from which surveys may be directed, at least until a better and permanent arrangement can be made. The desire is to cooperate with every society, organization, and individual interest that is disposed to lend its influence to the same effort.
      The old haphazard method of digging here and collecting there, with only the assembling of a collection in view, cannot lead to any useful results. The state should be plotted and worked in sections. Perhaps the county would be a convenient unit for study, but counties are purely artificial districts. A more rational and scientific division would be the natural regions, such as the River Raisin Valley, the Saginaw Basin, the Grand River Drainage Area, etc. Collaborators could investigate their local and adjoining units in such a way that when sufficient facts and data are assembled, an archaeological atlas, by counties or districts, might be issued as a state document or bulletin"

This 6" x 8-1/2",  195 page, soft cover, facsimile reprint is illustrated with 42 full page plates of engravings and photographs.   $18.95

   

Barbed Axe Earthworks

Pipes

Pottery Ceremonials

Shell

Sample  Plates - click on image to enlarge

Table of Contents

Introduction
CHAPTER I
The Peopling of North America
Origin of the First Americans. Primitive Traits Possessed in Common. Various Views as to the Origins of Cultural Divergences. Were the Primitive Americans a Homogenous People? General Social Conditions of the American Indian.
CHAPTER II
Geographical and Other Peculiarities of Michigan
CHAPTER III
Definitions
CHAPTER IV
The Value of Indian Relics
CHAPTER V
Earthworks
Mounds. Inclosures and Embankments. Pit Holes. Garden Beds.
CHAPTER VI
Trails and Sites
Trails. Village and Camp Sites. Burying Grounds. Workshops.
CHAPTER VII
Culture Traits
Hunting. Agriculture. Trade and Commerce. Warfare. Carpentry. Clothing. Medicine. Perforation of Skulls. Caches. Domestic Life. Rock Carvings.
CHAPTER VIII
Classification of Artifacts
Flints. Axes, Celts. Ceremonials. Clubs. Gorgets. Pipes. Mortars and Pestles. Pottery. Copper.
CHAPTER IX
References